Officials in Indonesia work to preserve small pocket of forest on the java island

Officials in Indonesia work to preserve small pocket of forest on the java island

 

Officials in Indonesia work to preserve small pocket of forest on the java island

Officials and researchers in Indonesia are working to preserve a small pocket of forest on the java island as the habitat of the jarvan gibbon, also known as the silvery gibbon, the primate unique to central and western java is now endangered by climate change and human encroachment. The estimates say there are only around 4 000 jarvan gibbons left.

  Take a look. Indonesia is racing to preserve its Last frontier for a vanishing primate. The jarvan gibbon is only found on java, which is Indonesia's most populous island. The gibbons play a vital role, dispersing seeds and regenerating the forest, but researchers worry that their already endangered numbers are dwindling. Their habitat could also be further impacted by a changing climate and human activities from hunting to agriculture. Conservationists say there are roughly Four thousand jarvan gibbons left on the island. Arosetawan has spent more than a decade monitoring the animals with the conservation group swara aura. He says the 400 strong population of gibbons in a reserve. Their monitor is stable, but now he worries for the habitat itself. The real threat now is the integrity of the forest itself because of the increasing number of human activities. Many people are encroaching upon it. Clearing the forest, which was originally the habitat of the gibbons swara owa, also works with the government. They hold monthly outreach programs with the local community and set up signs to try and ward off illegal hunting and logging in the forest. Conservationist antoro tree kanarawan says changes in the climate are a more complex challenge. It's still raining when it's supposed to be the dry season and that will Eventually impact the vegetation instead of fruiting season leaves grow, so the flower that is supposed to become fruit could decline and eventually impact the animals. Meanwhile, Suarez has worked to provide locals with alternative ways to make money, so they don't take a toll on the gibbons home they've set up local accommodation with tours focused on sustainability and work with local village chiefs on farming. Shade-grown coffee. It's a delicate balance to strike and the clock is ticking. Another group, the silver gibbon project, warns that there's a 50 50 chance. The animals could disappear in the next decade